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Transpatial Room Assets, Part 3


Within the RPG titles of the “Legends of Saviors” are many planets with different creatures, people, cultures, and histories that will all have a unique and distinct look from one another, but following a similar style.  I hope to create models that reflect exactly what it is I’m looking for, and create a consistent look with everything.

Other than creating various props to be used in a level (ones to interact with, others to give a sense of scale, realism, etc.), I also wanted to experiment with trying to create modular assets that could be used to create the actual game space, itself.  First, I would need walls, a floor, and possibly even a ceiling, so I ended up creating two different repeating textures that were both similar (to signify consistency in the technology embedded in the room), yet different (where one would be sport more vertical textures for the walls, while the other had more horizontal textures for the floor and ceiling).  I was able to layer together both a customized rocky texture, mixed with a themed circuit pattern (that I have been using with other models, concept art, etc.), and eventually add a bump map to each to give more depth, shininess, and an overall better look.

Creating the shape of the room was a good start, but I would also need another asset that would help break up the possible monotony the wall/ceiling/floor repeating textures present; so considering the room itself takes place within a type of mountain, I thought I’d create a cluster of hexagonal rock columns (with the mountain, itself, being the result of an igneous intrusion – which creates geometric columns of rock, everywhere).  The column cluster model could be used as different scaled stalactites and stalagmites (to show the player that they are indeed inside of something that might have possibly been natural at one point), as permanent light fixtures, and – as I said before – help break up the “squareness” of the room, itself, leading credence that it is indeed a real place, instead of just a blocked out room floating in space; I, too, would end up putting a bump map on the column clusters, and I feel it definitely helped tie in all of the pieces perfectly (which I will be posting some pictures of the “finished” level, soon).

Chimerdermy Puzzle Piece Models, Cont. Again


An indie, volunteer VR horror/puzzle game made by a group of local game developers in Lexington, Kentucky (RunJumpDev), “Mortimer’s Mansion” was created over a span of several months in the year of 2016, and is scheduled to be presented at this year’s LexPlay gaming convention at the end of October of 2016.  I was tasked with various jobs, one including designing and creating a specific, themed puzzle (out of many) for the game.

These are the last set of models I created from scratch (both meshes and textures), and were eventually used in game we have been creating.  I have yet to actually speak about this puzzle in particular, so let’s do just that!

In the beginning, each puzzle our team were to create needed to fit into a specific time in Mortimer’s life, growing up from a weird kid to an absolute mad man.  My puzzle, in particular, was supposed to represent the time of his life where he began to really delve into the aspect of perfecting and even creating new life.  Right away I knew that I wanted to create something that had to do with the creation of a chimera (or multiple chimeras, if possible).  I began to draw out the puzzle on Photoshop, and came up with a puzzle that included three specimen bodies (each were of a different species: like hamster, snake, and kiwi bird), and a variation of different taxidermy animal pieces one would have to match with the bodies (that were actually placed in dissection pans, held down by dissection pins).  At first, the hamster only needed a tail (in which you’d have to figure out of three tails, which would fit), the kiwi bird needed new arms and a tail (which in this case had to do with making the kiwi bird fly, hence putting the wings and tail feathers of other birds would suffice), and then the snake was going to need arms, legs, and also a tail (which for this specimen, it obviously would need more pieces attached than the other bodies.

To make a long story short, we eventually had to trim down the three specimens to only one (the snake was the victor), and try to focus on making the puzzle more succinct, yet still engaging.  I feel it turned out wonderful and I can’t wait for people at this year’s LexPlay to also enjoy what I (and the others) have created!

Chimerdermy Puzzle Piece Models, Cont.


An indie, volunteer VR horror/puzzle game made by a group of local game developers in Lexington, Kentucky (RunJumpDev), “Mortimer’s Mansion” was created over a span of several months in the year of 2016, and is scheduled to be presented at this year’s LexPlay gaming convention at the end of October of 2016.  I was tasked with various jobs, one including designing and creating a specific, themed puzzle (out of many) for the game.

As the project went along, we gained people and ideas, and eventually had to trim away some ideas because some of said people had left for various reasons, as well; but the core team of about 8 people or so held firm and fought through the entirety of the game production process.  We first started with a game that would take place in various rooms throughout a mansion, involving a player and about 6 “playable NPCs” that would be played by real people and would physically interact with the person with the Vive headset on.  We came to find out that was a bit ambitious, and scaled it down to a 6-player, 12-puzzle, 60 minute experience in a single room (a wing of a giant library), with a hidden room that would eventually open for the players at one point in the game.  This version, too, had to be trimmed down a tad, which made it into the final version we’ll be presenting at this year’s video game convention called LexPlay; where the game is now a single-player, 15 minute, 4-random-puzzle experience that will also add back some narrative that we had lost in the 2nd version.

In the next (and last) post about these models, I’ll explain some of the puzzles that made it into final version, and more specifically about the puzzle that I created and have been posting about!

Chimeradermy Puzzle Piece Models


An indie, volunteer VR horror/puzzle game made by a group of local game developers in Lexington, Kentucky (RunJumpDev), “Mortimer’s Mansion” was created over a span of several months in the year of 2016, and is scheduled to be presented at this year’s LexPlay gaming convention at the end of October of 2016.  I was tasked with various jobs, one including designing and creating a specific, themed puzzle (out of many) for the game.

During my 2nd semester at BCTC, an organization of local game devs – “RunJumpDev” – were coming together for the second year in a row to create something they called HVRE (which stands for “Halloween Virtual Reality Experience”).  The year before, for a small get together around Halloween time, the first HVRE presented was of a VR horror game that some members of RunJumpDev had created over the span of a few months.  This second year, they were looking to expand on what they had done previously, and even to the point of wanting to use a Vive VR headset (instead of the somewhat stationary Gear VR they had used before).  They enlisted volunteers of various ages and backgrounds from several places (which ended up being over 20 people in all, testers included) and I just so happened to be one of those lucky people!

From the very get-go, I was tasked with social networking (to keep up a weekly blog of our progress on our personal Wix page and to update our Twitter page a couple of times, weekly), helping come up with ideas for overall narrative, puzzle design, lore, and mechanics, and I also even got to design an entire puzzle from scratch, being able to create models and textures for my idea, as well!

Above are the final versions of some of the models I created, these being the centralized pieces for the actual interactive pieces that I will be posting soon enough!

RPGMaker Character Portraits (Throwback)


The origins of “Legends of Saviors” lies within a Dragon Ball Z/Dragon Ball GT and Mortal Kombat amalgamated fan-fiction I had acted out with friends, wrote documents on, created a D&D campaign based on the lore, and crafted a short game made in RPGMaker.  I still have drawings from those days, and thought some people might be interested in what was going on almost two decades ago.

During the last year of working on the RPGMaker version of LoS (in 2005ish), I found a program that was able to help me draw up anime-inspired portraits, and was able to import these to my project.  This was basically a way for me to use assets and mix them up to make, what I thought, was what most of the characters would eventually look like (based mostly on what I had already drawn already, up to that point).  Comparing the “Original” drawings of the Buntaiens I have been posting, and the newer concepts (the ones in the montage videos), I feel these were a good halfway point to really figure out what they would look like.  Obviously (from the newer concepts), some of the character have changed a bit, but most have retained their original qualities, and will keep their distinct features and personalities, intact

The Original Yenen, Cont. (Throwback)


The origins of “Legends of Saviors” lies within a Dragon Ball Z/Dragon Ball GT and Mortal Kombat amalgamated fan-fiction I had acted out with friends, wrote documents on, created a D&D campaign based on the lore, and crafted a short game made in RPGMaker.  I still have drawings from those days, and thought some people might be interested in what was going on almost two decades ago.

As time progressed, so did the style and story of Yenen.  Even 10 years ago, around the same time the picture above was drawn, Yenen’s story had blossomed into something far deeper than previously conceived about him.  His origins and actions will now play a crucial role not only for a couple of planets, but has (and will again) been the catalyst for much change within the Saro Perspective, itself.

The first picture posted above was drawn around the same time I had first redesigned Yenen (to be less Saiyan/Namek, and more unique) into a bulky version of his original form.  Again, in my mind, I never felt like Yenen was a muscle-bound character, and believed he relied mostly on his speed and wit to get him through situations, so eventually (and this was around the same time as the RPGMaker version of “The Buntaien Souls” – named “The Souls Within,” originally – was being created) I redrew him again (the second picture posted), but more to coincide with how the in-game sprite of his character looked; which luckily looked thinner.  As for the third picture posted, I drew this a year after I had quit making the RPGMaker version (which was around 2005), and since then, I feel this is the best profile of Yenen, to date; I believe it encompasses both his determination, but also his serenity (or perhaps his veil, thereof).

Buntaien Brawlers In-Game Overlay, Cont.


Within the 3D-Arena, Fighting title “Buntaien Brawlers,” players will be able to engage in many different modes, with a cast of diverse characters, on a various amounts of planets/Arenas, using powerful and distinct abilities to brawl against other Buntaiens (both offline and online).

A follow up on the last post, dealing with a specific interface that would overlay the screen during the brawls, these three pictures will help explain the details of each color, module, and sprite that could, one day, make it in to a playable version (or at least a variation of it).  The Essence (once called “Elements”), Level-Select (the sprite of the planet), and the Dan Tien Medallion’s different components would eventually get animated, that could change after different events (losing Health [also known as Chi], gaining Essence, filling up with Power [also known as Soul], etc.), and could possibly be interacted with, based on the platform(s) the game could be released on (specially talking about possible mobile, tablet, and/or touchscreen versions, later on).