Galleries

Original Character Cards


I previously posted the original template for the different Cards within the first version of the Character Deck for “DDnD – Unsung Saviors,” conveying the basics of what I thought the players would needs through all of the campaigns to come.  With that version still in mind, I wanted to test out what a more completed looking Statistic Card for each of the 5 main, playable characters.  What you see above is examples of what could happen, uniquely for each, during some of their travels.

For example, at this point with Yenen, he has acquired his unique Buntaien Weapon, which is now represented as a shadow of the weapon itself – just like with the Gear icons that players can acquire during campaigns.  He has also learned his first “Status” Ability (represented by the blue dot within the “S” row under Abilities) and his first “Healing” Ability (represented by the blue dot within the “H” row under Abilities).  As well, he has apparently found a Kay crystal in his travels, with the memory of the intact North Bridge city – that was once one of the two technological capitals of the world – and could help the player figure out the mysteries of planet Par’N more easily.

As for the others shown, they all follow the same structure as with Yenen, except the content will be specific for each character (as with Wajoby getting a shield-like Buntaien Weapon compared to Yenen’s sword, some players may choose to learn certain Abilities in a different order than others, and Kay Memories can only be learned by one character for each crystal that is found, so those will be unique to each character, as well).  I will eventually post the second version of the Character Deck I created during the first run through of Campaign #1, to show off some of the new structure and features.

Original Character Deck Template


While in the midst of creating the GM interface and all of the assets that would be needed for it to work and be presentable, I had to also consider creating something that would help tie the players to their characters (other than the basic statistics on the Player Viewer side of the interface).  Like with Dungeons and Dragons – where players have unique character sheets – I, too, wanted to devise my own Character Cards to help explain who their characters are, what they can do, what can be unlocked, and other bits of information that would be prudent.

What you see above is the first template for what I coined a “Character Deck,” which – at this point – has three different pages (or “Cards”) with varying amounts of information.  The first Card is known as the “Statistics Card,” and has all of the necessary stats, abilities, and other battle-related data for one’s character.  Each character portrait would be put into the middle, with their names and Essences right above (these would never change throughout the game).  As for the other parts, throughout each Campaign, players would be able to build upon what they start out with, learning new abilities, find and wearing gear, obtaining special memories from Kay crystals, and unlocking their unique Buntaien weapons.  As for their Chi and Soul numbers, those would change dependent on what was happening during a battle, but their maximum numbers will always stay the same under normal circumstances.

The second page is known as the “Inventory Card,” and as you might have already guessed, is where players can jot down all of the items they find in their journeys (whether it’s a makeshift torch or an important quest item).  As for the third page, it is known as the “Personal Card,” and gives a sort of in-depth introduction to what the characters look like, how they act and treat others around them, and a little bit of history; all should help players role play as their chosen Buntaien and give them some understanding to their character.

During the first team’s run through in the first Campaign, I saw that this template wouldn’t last for future playthroughs, so I ended up creating a newer 4-page Deck, with some minor changes here and there that would allow for some newer aspects of the game.  I plan on posting that version eventually, as well!

Character Medallions


Considering I had created a grid system for player movement on the maps within the map viewer of the GM interface, I needed something to indicate when and where characters were moving.  Using the portraits I had already created for the 5 main characters, I took away some details of their faces (like the eyes, mouth, and nose), and shrunk them down to fit inside little “medallions” I had also created for them (using their designated colors).

Each Character Medallion can be moved around the map, using the grid, in all directions (even diagonally).  Also, whenever the players are in a battle and they put their characters into a “Focus Stance” – something I will be discussing and posting about later – a certain particle effect occurs behind each Medallion, signifying to them and the other players that they are indeed in Power Stance.

DDnD Campaign #1 Player Gear Icons


Considering “DDnD – Unsung Saviors” is still an RPG at heart, it was bound to have collectibles that players would be able to gather through puzzles, trials, hidden locations, etc.  I coined a certain tier of collectibles I created as “gear:” items that can be worn by the player’s characters like clothing, armor, and other physical embellishments.  For now (with the items created above), I have not tacked on any statistics or augmentations of any kind with these pieces, but instead are just collected for personal aesthetics.  Perhaps in future campaigns, gear will give statistic bonuses or some other type of benefit to players and their characters, but for now, I just wanted to give player’s something to collect in Campaign #1.

As for what you are seeing above, I created four different icons of the shadows of a gear set known as the “RuMa Temple Gi.”  All pieces of the set are made from a very elastic, yet durable material, colored with a very dark, black die.  On certain parts of each piece of the set, unique symbols will show up in a dazzling and exclusive color dependent on the temperament of one’s soul who wears them.  For example, if the blue-haird Yenen were to don the pants, yellow streaks of lightning would show up from each bottom hem, trailing up and above each knee.

The gear shown above is a headband, a shirt, a pair of hakama pants, and a pair of slippers.  In days of old on Par’N (where this set of gear can be found), certain priests of different religions would leave their homes, families, and scriptures to make a pilgrimage to the sacred Earth Temple on the northern pole of the planet.  On their journey, they were to bring a shard of Kay crystal with them, in order to use it to create their own RuMa Temple Gi set, and begin their new lives as monks of the temple.

PTK Revamped Societal Crest Logo


After graduating from BCTC last year, and becoming an Alumni member within PTK honor society, I still wanted to be a part of this group that took me in, and wanted to keep giving back.  Eventually, myself and the most current president, at the time, decided that we should create some type of logo for not only our chapter, but also maybe the honor society, in general.  His idea was a simple horse around the name of our chapter, but I didn’t feel it was going to be as impactful as he maybe thought, so I decided to take a week and create something that would hopefully bedazzle him and the other members.

After taking a couple of days to actually come up with what I was going to create, looking through the history of our honor society, I found out that our societal crest hadn’t been updated in over a century.  I took it upon myself to test whether I could make something like the examples I had been researching, and decided to create 3 different versions in Illustrator, of which we could all vote upon at the next member meeting that was to be held.  During said meeting, the members – and the president I had collaborate with – were overjoyed to see how much effort I had put into it, and we all decided that the second one above encompassed exactly what we were looking for.  I took all of the symbols and codes from the original crest design and exaggerated them.  The owl, each leaf, every wisp of fire has a meaning to the members of PTK, and I hope they were able to take it all in.

Eventually, we were to put this logo on shirts, hoodies, newsletters, and many other items, and hopefully even more things in the near future!

Yenen’s Tale Assets, Part 6


During my second foray into the college life, I decided to go for an Associate’s in Video Game Design (specifically for the artsy side of the process, rather than the technical parts, for now).  During these two years at BCTCS, I have learned how to create GDDs appropriately, construct 3D models using Maya, create textures for those models (using Photoshop and Maya), import assets and create small games with said assets within Unity, and learned overall about the new and old techniques it takes to make an efficient and unique video game.

After creating the game objects that would, more or less, act as the intractable items in the scene (the Kay Crystal, the Kumojahitii Blade, Yenen, himself, etc.), it was then time to create the actual landscape pieces that would act as both artistic scenery bolsters and technical area boundaries.  After creating some brief concept art of the planet Par’N (in which this game takes places) some time ago, I have been expounding on the ideas I had previously come up with, and attempted to stay true to the look and lore of this already established planet.

With that being said, I wanted this area of the game, in particular, to somewhat tone down the official lore (where a lot of the planet began implementing Signa technology, rendering a lot of their foliage and landscapes as “geo-mechanical”) and showcase an area of the planet that hadn’t really been touched by the most recent wave of technology; I wanted hints of the planet’s technology (like the particle generating light post) spread throughout, but not being the foundation in which the level was built upon.

So, considering this scene would mostly be showing the untouched version of what most of Par’N might have looked like, I had to create the landscape objects with a more organic look, compared to most of the other game objects.  Also, with Par’N being a tropical and almost entirely flooded planet (at this point in the story), I had to take this into consideration when creating the base meshes and eventual textures (with a lot of foliage on the rocks/mountains and their shapes showing signs of weathered use by the elements.

Yenen’s Tale Assets, Part 4


During my second foray into the college life, I decided to go for an Associate’s in Video Game Design (specifically for the artsy side of the process, rather than the technical parts, for now).  During these two years at BCTCS, I have learned how to create GDDs appropriately, construct 3D models using Maya, create textures for those models (using Photoshop and Maya), import assets and create small games with said assets within Unity, and learned overall about the new and old techniques it takes to make an efficient and unique video game.

Sticking with a low-poly, stylized design for my Final project in Video Game Development, I reached into my well of a mind and brought out an enemy type similar to one that can be found in an old PS1 game entitled “Legend of LeGaia.”  Being one of my top 100 games, I thought I’d do some throwback to the title, and then add my own flair.  With that being said, even though the shape itself is similar, the color palette and lore behind this creature is completely different.  I wanted to create a metallic bug-like creature that would have slashes across its carapace, as if others had been trying to defeat this beast for a while prior to the player finding it.  It’s greatest weak point is its “stomach cage,” which can be seen accompanied with light sources to give the player’s sight some direction, showcasing its gooey, purple center; which the color purple will be indicative of an enemy type, representing the color of the “lost” 6th Buntaien, Normg.

I feel like I could have done better with the textures and model overall, but this was an optional thing we had to create, and I just wanted to create some bulky, intimidating, and personally familiar.

Yenen’s Tale Assets, Part 3


During my second foray into the college life, I decided to go for an Associate’s in Video Game Design (specifically for the artsy side of the process, rather than the technical parts, for now).  During these two years at BCTCS, I have learned how to create GDDs appropriately, construct 3D models using Maya, create textures for those models (using Photoshop and Maya), import assets and create small games with said assets within Unity, and learned overall about the new and old techniques it takes to make an efficient and unique video game.

After recreating some of the organic and synthetic assets for the simple RPG scene in mind, I also wanted to recreate some of the other aspects (in which I actually plan on recreating EVERY asset in the default scene, eventually).  At one point last year, I decided to create and model the fabled Kumojahitii blade that Yenen (one of the main characters from the “LoS:TBS” series; which more information can be seen throughout this website on that topic).  In doing so, I created the 3 different forms of the weapon, but then decided recently that I might as well utilize one of those forms for this project (I decided on the first and simplest form, considering all of these assets are supposed to be “low-poly”).  I feel adding a splash of color to it really brought it to life, and hope it will mesh well with the project in mind.  Some might say it looks eerily similar to Link’s Master Sword from “TLoZ” series, but imitation is usually the best form of flattery; and this was definitely not my initial intentions, of course.

The shield – or to be more precise, a buckler – was also created with the planet’s technology in mind, bearing a resemblance to form and color with the other Par’Nian devices.  As for the function of this particular buckler, I figured instead of simply blocking or parrying attacks, you would be able to magnetize weapons upon its face, so that the one holding the buckler could control or even disarm the weapon they are facing against.  I would think that this wouldn’t just simply attract types of metals, but basically anything that touches the reinforced spikes on its front side (acting almost more like an “inverted force field,” trapping anything within that specific area).  Even though the shape, itself, looks more like a tower shield, this buckler does indeed attach to either forearm of the user.

As for the cluster of squares you see above, I wanted to replace the standard crystal clusters in the default scene with a type of crystal of my own.  Since the “LoS” series revolves around the entity known as Kay and the physical bits of its existence that shows up in the material reality in the games (known as Kay crystals, Kay shards, Kay clusters, etc.), I wanted to make sure each planet that had actually been infused with Kay material would sport a specific look for each, depending on that planet’s native sun.  The example above would be the type of Kay crystal clusters found on the planet Par’N, and the reasoning for its specific look is because Par’N’s native sun is known as the “Earth Sun.”  This type of sun engenders the essence of the cube within all of the plants, animals, sentient creatures, and even certain planetary systems of Par’N.  Considering Wajoby took in the Buntaien soul from the Earth Sun, he is represented by the sacral chakra, which is also represented by the color orange (hence the orange color of the cluster itself – a type of “pure” essence of the sun, itself).  Also, from a technical standpoint, I wanted to mess around with transparency as well, and hope that this asset will render marvelously within the scene, itself.

Yenen’s Tale Assets, Part 2


During my second foray into the college life, I decided to go for an Associate’s in Video Game Design (specifically for the artsy side of the process, rather than the technical parts, for now).  During these two years at BCTCS, I have learned how to create GDDs appropriately, construct 3D models using Maya, create textures for those models (using Photoshop and Maya), import assets and create small games with said assets within Unity, and learned overall about the new and old techniques it takes to make an efficient and unique video game.

While designing and creating the foliage, I also contemplated recreating the not-so-organic assets (a light post, a sign post, etc.) that Austin – the man who is helping to create Simple RPG lecture videos for those of us who want to follow and learn  – had already created and allowed us to us as “placeholders.”  So in keeping to the themes of the planet Par’N (which can be viewed in a variety of older posts on this site), I wanted to turn those derivative set pieces into ones that would make more sense in my particular setting I was in the midst of creating.  So, as you can see from the pictures above, I went about changing out the sign post into a type of lite-up, mechanical “billboard,” changing out the light post into a battery-charge, illumination device (reminiscent of highway street lights), and then eventually changing out all of the generic, wooden crates into reinforced, mechanical boxes.

I chose to stay with a simple color palette that would be seen on all of the technological bits; using a type of light-bluish gray to help differentiate these pieces with the more organic ones – like the overly green trees, ferns, etc.  I also wanted to keep a theme of the type of technology being seen, where each assets sports jagged edges, “monitor grids” (except for the box), warning strips (not seen on the Monitor Sign), an, yet again, keeping the number of colors to a minimum of 2 or 3 base colors (in this instance, light-bluish gray, bright cyan, and basic yellow).  I feel I did pretty well at keeping a cohesive theme with these particular assets, and hope they will blend well with the rest of the scene’s as they near completion.

Yenen’s Tale Assets, Part 1


During my second foray into the college life, I decided to go for an Associate’s in Video Game Design (specifically for the artsy side of the process, rather than the technical parts, for now).  During these two years at BCTCS, I have learned how to create GDDs appropriately, construct 3D models using Maya, create textures for those models (using Photoshop and Maya), import assets and create small games with said assets within Unity, and learned overall about the new and old techniques it takes to make an efficient and unique video game.

During this last semester at BCTC – for my Game Production class – I am having to follow the lead of an amateur game designer through his Patreon, where he posts video tutorials on the creation of simple RPG assets and mechanics with a low-poly design.  For now, we have learned the basics of setting up a scene correctly (with fog effects, lighting effects, culling rates, etc.), pulling in assets (which he has generously given to his “students” for free, to help with the creation of one’s first RPG), and are now attempting to create error-free scripts that will give the game all of the nuances of an actual RPG (like stats, adventure, fighting enemies, etc.).

So what I am also doing, according to the classes’ curriculum, is having to replace almost everything in the “Simple RPG Test” scene that I’m creating alongside the videos, with assets and mechanics of my own making; that is where we come to the pictures above!  The scene, so far, is an area that comes off of a mountain path, leading into a certain mysterious forest.  So with that in mind, I wanted to replace the default flowers, ferns, bushes, and trees in the scene with what you see above.  The first picture being that of a “Fractal Flower” (where it’s leaves assists each other in the transportation of water to one another), the second picture showing a “Fractal Fern” (where thick vines sprout from the base of the plant, eventually encircling themselves, creating a braided effect), and the third picture being a “Fractal Tree;” damn, couldn’t keep up the alliteration!

These were my first attempt at purposely creating low-poly models, and I feel I have learned a lot on how to create something simple looking, yet impactful and true to the source material, in mind.