Category Archives: 3D Models

Various types of models, mostly all created in Maya, that I had to create for my BCTC classes.

Yenen’s Tale Assets, Part 7

The two parts to the Par’Nian cave

During my second foray into the college life, I decided to go for an Associate’s in Video Game Design (specifically for the artsy side of the process, rather than the technical parts, for now).  During these two years at BCTCS, I have learned how to create GDDs appropriately, construct 3D models using Maya, create textures for those models (using Photoshop and Maya), import assets and create small games with said assets within Unity, and learned overall about the new and old techniques it takes to make an efficient and unique video game.

As with the other landscape pieces I did, I wanted to keep to the same color pallet and themes, and use for those the cave that would be cradle for the centerpiece of this particular scene; this cave can be ventured into in-game, but it is not as deep as it may appear.  As for the dirt flooring panel I created, I used it as both the flooring of the cave itself, and as “visible floors” for the player, so they would not be able to venture out of the desired playing area, messing up any semblance of cohesion, haha.

Even though all of the the objects I created were low-poly – regardless of the player model, enemy model, the weapon, the items, whatever – I still feel they all came out better than I had hoped, and feel after putting them together in the scene I keep mentioning, they all fit together perfectly, and really helps show off what I was trying to portray.  At this current moment I am working on an Alpha version of this game/scene and plan on rolling out a working Beta at the end of this month (of April), so look forward to some actual game play (whether through a linked video, posted .gif file, or what-have-you)!

Yenen’s Tale Assets, Part 6


During my second foray into the college life, I decided to go for an Associate’s in Video Game Design (specifically for the artsy side of the process, rather than the technical parts, for now).  During these two years at BCTCS, I have learned how to create GDDs appropriately, construct 3D models using Maya, create textures for those models (using Photoshop and Maya), import assets and create small games with said assets within Unity, and learned overall about the new and old techniques it takes to make an efficient and unique video game.

After creating the game objects that would, more or less, act as the intractable items in the scene (the Kay Crystal, the Kumojahitii Blade, Yenen, himself, etc.), it was then time to create the actual landscape pieces that would act as both artistic scenery bolsters and technical area boundaries.  After creating some brief concept art of the planet Par’N (in which this game takes places) some time ago, I have been expounding on the ideas I had previously come up with, and attempted to stay true to the look and lore of this already established planet.

With that being said, I wanted this area of the game, in particular, to somewhat tone down the official lore (where a lot of the planet began implementing Signa technology, rendering a lot of their foliage and landscapes as “geo-mechanical”) and showcase an area of the planet that hadn’t really been touched by the most recent wave of technology; I wanted hints of the planet’s technology (like the particle generating light post) spread throughout, but not being the foundation in which the level was built upon.

So, considering this scene would mostly be showing the untouched version of what most of Par’N might have looked like, I had to create the landscape objects with a more organic look, compared to most of the other game objects.  Also, with Par’N being a tropical and almost entirely flooded planet (at this point in the story), I had to take this into consideration when creating the base meshes and eventual textures (with a lot of foliage on the rocks/mountains and their shapes showing signs of weathered use by the elements.

Yenen’s Tale Assets, Part 5

A low-poly version of the “LoS” character, Yenen, for a current project

During my second foray into the college life, I decided to go for an Associate’s in Video Game Design (specifically for the artsy side of the process, rather than the technical parts, for now).  During these two years at BCTCS, I have learned how to create GDDs appropriately, construct 3D models using Maya, create textures for those models (using Photoshop and Maya), import assets and create small games with said assets within Unity, and learned overall about the new and old techniques it takes to make an efficient and unique video game.

After creating my first version of Yenen during my 3rd semester – a higher-poly version that, personally, didn’t fit any standard of excellence – I felt I needed to do him better justice, so when my last semester came around and I was tasked with creating a low-poly RPG, I knew I could definitely make something better than I had before; as they say, less is sometimes better.

With that being said, my inspiration were the oddly formed character sprites of the PS1 days (with games like FF7, FF9, Legend of LeGaia, etc.), and wanted to pay tribute to the games I grew up with and helped mold me into who I am today.  Even though this may seem like is a crude model to some (barely reaching 1,000 polys and keeping to a simplistic texture style), I am way prouder of this compared to the first one I staggered through, and can’t wait to start animating it (in which I will post about in a couple of months)!

Yenen’s Tale Assets, Part 4


During my second foray into the college life, I decided to go for an Associate’s in Video Game Design (specifically for the artsy side of the process, rather than the technical parts, for now).  During these two years at BCTCS, I have learned how to create GDDs appropriately, construct 3D models using Maya, create textures for those models (using Photoshop and Maya), import assets and create small games with said assets within Unity, and learned overall about the new and old techniques it takes to make an efficient and unique video game.

Sticking with a low-poly, stylized design for my Final project in Video Game Development, I reached into my well of a mind and brought out an enemy type similar to one that can be found in an old PS1 game entitled “Legend of LeGaia.”  Being one of my top 100 games, I thought I’d do some throwback to the title, and then add my own flair.  With that being said, even though the shape itself is similar, the color palette and lore behind this creature is completely different.  I wanted to create a metallic bug-like creature that would have slashes across its carapace, as if others had been trying to defeat this beast for a while prior to the player finding it.  It’s greatest weak point is its “stomach cage,” which can be seen accompanied with light sources to give the player’s sight some direction, showcasing its gooey, purple center; which the color purple will be indicative of an enemy type, representing the color of the “lost” 6th Buntaien, Normg.

I feel like I could have done better with the textures and model overall, but this was an optional thing we had to create, and I just wanted to create some bulky, intimidating, and personally familiar.

Yenen’s Tale Assets, Part 3


During my second foray into the college life, I decided to go for an Associate’s in Video Game Design (specifically for the artsy side of the process, rather than the technical parts, for now).  During these two years at BCTCS, I have learned how to create GDDs appropriately, construct 3D models using Maya, create textures for those models (using Photoshop and Maya), import assets and create small games with said assets within Unity, and learned overall about the new and old techniques it takes to make an efficient and unique video game.

After recreating some of the organic and synthetic assets for the simple RPG scene in mind, I also wanted to recreate some of the other aspects (in which I actually plan on recreating EVERY asset in the default scene, eventually).  At one point last year, I decided to create and model the fabled Kumojahitii blade that Yenen (one of the main characters from the “LoS:TBS” series; which more information can be seen throughout this website on that topic).  In doing so, I created the 3 different forms of the weapon, but then decided recently that I might as well utilize one of those forms for this project (I decided on the first and simplest form, considering all of these assets are supposed to be “low-poly”).  I feel adding a splash of color to it really brought it to life, and hope it will mesh well with the project in mind.  Some might say it looks eerily similar to Link’s Master Sword from “TLoZ” series, but imitation is usually the best form of flattery; and this was definitely not my initial intentions, of course.

The shield – or to be more precise, a buckler – was also created with the planet’s technology in mind, bearing a resemblance to form and color with the other Par’Nian devices.  As for the function of this particular buckler, I figured instead of simply blocking or parrying attacks, you would be able to magnetize weapons upon its face, so that the one holding the buckler could control or even disarm the weapon they are facing against.  I would think that this wouldn’t just simply attract types of metals, but basically anything that touches the reinforced spikes on its front side (acting almost more like an “inverted force field,” trapping anything within that specific area).  Even though the shape, itself, looks more like a tower shield, this buckler does indeed attach to either forearm of the user.

As for the cluster of squares you see above, I wanted to replace the standard crystal clusters in the default scene with a type of crystal of my own.  Since the “LoS” series revolves around the entity known as Kay and the physical bits of its existence that shows up in the material reality in the games (known as Kay crystals, Kay shards, Kay clusters, etc.), I wanted to make sure each planet that had actually been infused with Kay material would sport a specific look for each, depending on that planet’s native sun.  The example above would be the type of Kay crystal clusters found on the planet Par’N, and the reasoning for its specific look is because Par’N’s native sun is known as the “Earth Sun.”  This type of sun engenders the essence of the cube within all of the plants, animals, sentient creatures, and even certain planetary systems of Par’N.  Considering Wajoby took in the Buntaien soul from the Earth Sun, he is represented by the sacral chakra, which is also represented by the color orange (hence the orange color of the cluster itself – a type of “pure” essence of the sun, itself).  Also, from a technical standpoint, I wanted to mess around with transparency as well, and hope that this asset will render marvelously within the scene, itself.

Yenen’s Tale Assets, Part 2


During my second foray into the college life, I decided to go for an Associate’s in Video Game Design (specifically for the artsy side of the process, rather than the technical parts, for now).  During these two years at BCTCS, I have learned how to create GDDs appropriately, construct 3D models using Maya, create textures for those models (using Photoshop and Maya), import assets and create small games with said assets within Unity, and learned overall about the new and old techniques it takes to make an efficient and unique video game.

While designing and creating the foliage, I also contemplated recreating the not-so-organic assets (a light post, a sign post, etc.) that Austin – the man who is helping to create Simple RPG lecture videos for those of us who want to follow and learn  – had already created and allowed us to us as “placeholders.”  So in keeping to the themes of the planet Par’N (which can be viewed in a variety of older posts on this site), I wanted to turn those derivative set pieces into ones that would make more sense in my particular setting I was in the midst of creating.  So, as you can see from the pictures above, I went about changing out the sign post into a type of lite-up, mechanical “billboard,” changing out the light post into a battery-charge, illumination device (reminiscent of highway street lights), and then eventually changing out all of the generic, wooden crates into reinforced, mechanical boxes.

I chose to stay with a simple color palette that would be seen on all of the technological bits; using a type of light-bluish gray to help differentiate these pieces with the more organic ones – like the overly green trees, ferns, etc.  I also wanted to keep a theme of the type of technology being seen, where each assets sports jagged edges, “monitor grids” (except for the box), warning strips (not seen on the Monitor Sign), an, yet again, keeping the number of colors to a minimum of 2 or 3 base colors (in this instance, light-bluish gray, bright cyan, and basic yellow).  I feel I did pretty well at keeping a cohesive theme with these particular assets, and hope they will blend well with the rest of the scene’s as they near completion.

Yenen’s Tale Assets, Part 1


During my second foray into the college life, I decided to go for an Associate’s in Video Game Design (specifically for the artsy side of the process, rather than the technical parts, for now).  During these two years at BCTCS, I have learned how to create GDDs appropriately, construct 3D models using Maya, create textures for those models (using Photoshop and Maya), import assets and create small games with said assets within Unity, and learned overall about the new and old techniques it takes to make an efficient and unique video game.

During this last semester at BCTC – for my Game Production class – I am having to follow the lead of an amateur game designer through his Patreon, where he posts video tutorials on the creation of simple RPG assets and mechanics with a low-poly design.  For now, we have learned the basics of setting up a scene correctly (with fog effects, lighting effects, culling rates, etc.), pulling in assets (which he has generously given to his “students” for free, to help with the creation of one’s first RPG), and are now attempting to create error-free scripts that will give the game all of the nuances of an actual RPG (like stats, adventure, fighting enemies, etc.).

So what I am also doing, according to the classes’ curriculum, is having to replace almost everything in the “Simple RPG Test” scene that I’m creating alongside the videos, with assets and mechanics of my own making; that is where we come to the pictures above!  The scene, so far, is an area that comes off of a mountain path, leading into a certain mysterious forest.  So with that in mind, I wanted to replace the default flowers, ferns, bushes, and trees in the scene with what you see above.  The first picture being that of a “Fractal Flower” (where it’s leaves assists each other in the transportation of water to one another), the second picture showing a “Fractal Fern” (where thick vines sprout from the base of the plant, eventually encircling themselves, creating a braided effect), and the third picture being a “Fractal Tree;” damn, couldn’t keep up the alliteration!

These were my first attempt at purposely creating low-poly models, and I feel I have learned a lot on how to create something simple looking, yet impactful and true to the source material, in mind.

Rigged Yenen Model

My first rigged character model
My first cut scene dealing with Yenen

During my second foray into the college life, I decided to go for an Associate’s in Video Game Design (specifically for the artsy side of the process, rather than the technical parts, for now).  During these two years at BCTCS, I have learned how to create GDDs appropriately, construct 3D models using Maya, create textures for those models (using Photoshop and Maya), import assets and create small games with said assets within Unity, and learned overall about the new and old techniques it takes to make an efficient and unique video game.

For my final project within one of my video game development courses, I was tasked with creating a lone cut-scene that would utilize various assets and components I had previously created and used from prior projects in the same class.  I had to rig up my very first character model (being Yenen from my “Legends of Saviors” series), create a small environment in which Yenen would be able to interact with, and eventually animate my character with a 3-6 second animation within said environment.  I imported some models from my original “Transpatial Room” that I had made previously, and created a somewhat “side-scrolling” version of it to encompass the flip animation I had designed up in a storyboard for this project.

It took a lot of hours, sweat, and sacrifice, but I was able to complete the project just hours before it was due, and luckily made a 110/100 grade for it once it was all said and done!  I plan on creating a video or gif of the actual animation, and will post about it once that happens.

Kamina Minion Model (Interactive)


During my second foray into the college life, I decided to go for an Associate’s in Video Game Design (specifically for the artsy side of the process, rather than the technical parts, for now).  During these two years at BCTCS, I have learned how to create GDDs appropriately, construct 3D models using Maya, create textures for those models (using Photoshop and Maya), import assets and create small games with said assets within Unity, and learned overall about the new and old techniques it takes to make an efficient and unique video game.

This is an interactive version of the model I created in my 3rd semester at BCTC for an animation project; the Kamina minion (also known as “Kaminion”).  Here is the prior post about this specific model, with more details and background information if you so desire to read it!

Kamina Minion Model

kaminion2-1

A minion in the likeness of Kamina from Gurren Lagann
A minion in the likeness of Kamina from Gurren Lagann

During my second foray into the college life, I decided to go for an Associate’s in Video Game Design (specifically for the artsy side of the process, rather than the technical parts, for now).  During these two years at BCTCS, I have learned how to create GDDs appropriately, construct 3D models using Maya, create textures for those models (using Photoshop and Maya), import assets and create small games with said assets within Unity, and learned overall about the new and old techniques it takes to make an efficient and unique video game.

Halfway into my 3rd semester at BCTC, I was tasked with the creation of my very first character model; of which, for this project, had to be of a minion from the movie series “Despicable Me.”  We were asked to either create one from the movies, or design and model a version of our choosing.  When I first started the model, I was wanting to create a goth/emo-like minion, sporting a mohawk, spiked bracelets, and the like.  As I began to develop the mesh further, I started to create a cape for some reason, which gave me the idea to make a Dracula-esque minion, with fangs and so forth.  However, as the cape took shape, all I could think of was one thing; Kamina from the anime Gurren Lagann, and how awesome it would be to see a minion that looked like him in his full garb – with giant sunglasses and all!

As you can see, things went better than expected, and I even eventually added pants and a belt near the end, because a theme of all minions is that they all wear pants (maybe because of their horrific-looking genitalia…whose to say!) and also because my wife kept insisting that he wear some.

I am very proud and humbled by this model; mostly because I was freaking out before I began the project, thinking I wouldn’t be able to do it, but luckily I was able to persevere, anyway.  But also because this was the very first character I have ever modeled, and it didn’t turn out looking like total ass, lol!