Category Archives: College Projects

Everything having to do with the many projects during my 2 years at Bluegrass Community and Technical College (BCTCS).

Yenen’s Tale Final Showcase


Within the last 2 weeks of school at BCTC, I was able to squeeze in two scenes where there should have only been one for my final in Video Game design.  I hope I was able to somewhat floor my teacher for my attempt at going above and beyond, but either way, I know I had a lot of fun making it and learned a lot of things I had never considered before.

Eventually last year, I was to take this game and create a VR version for an annual HVRE project; this year our game’s theme was to be “dreams,” and what better game of mine to have than “Yenen’s Tale” (a game that has been in the making for quite some time).  In the next couple of weeks, I will be posting a myriad of information on “Yenen’s Tale” – the VR version – and the other two “Dreams” games I helped create last year!

Enjoy the video.

Yenen’s Tale Walk Cycle


Nearing the end of my last semester at BCTC in 2017, I was to perfect a game I had been working on for almost the last year, through and for different classes, in different semesters.  “Yenen’s Tale” – another game in the “Legends of Saviors” series I’ve been in the midst of creating – was the name I gave my final project, and it was looking to be a very nice piece of work (if I may say so!).

This video shows off the first walking cycle I had ever put into a video game, and even though I was still very inexperienced at the coding part of what I needed to do, I was able to use Maya and Mechanim – the latter within Unity – effectively enough to create something that wasn’t entirely horrible!

Enjoy the video.

Ronin Yeti Designs 2nd Business Card

Front and back of the most current Ronin Yeti Design business cards

During my time at BCTC, I have learned how to use Photoshop, Maya, Unity, and many other programs that I never even touched before.  I have been tasked with creating models, design documents, characters, logos, and many other creations and have been both challenged and enthralled with these projects!

As mentioned in my previous post, my favorite version of my revamped logo happens to be the one I used in the middle of the back (or front, depends on one’s perspective) of the second business card I have created.  I am very proud of this design (both front and back), and feels, even though it might be a little cliche, that the style, colors, and information works very well; telling a small story as to who I am and where to find me.

The information side gives the viewer all of my top talents, and even has a small, triangle pattern that transitions to the “art” side (which shows a small sample as to my style of creation); the latter detail was actually proposed by my wife, so a shout out to her, per usual!

If you happen to live in Lexington, Kentucky, you might see these (or the first version) stuck about on random billboards in coffee shops, grocery stores, and anywhere else that might have a tack or two laying around to use.

Ronin Yeti Designs 2nd Logo Concepts

Different versions of the revamped Ronin Yeti logo/icon

During my time at BCTC, I have learned how to use Photoshop, Maya, Unity, and many other programs that I never even touched before.  I have been tasked with creating models, design documents, characters, logos, and many other creations and have been both challenged and enthralled with these projects!

After almost 2 years (at the end of time at BCTC), I was taskd with creating a business or company of my choice, so I obviously picked my own freelancing studio; which gave me the ample opportunity to FINALLY edit and revamp my previous logo (which I’m still very proud of, for a first try, back then).

My favorite of the 6 types of logos above is actually not one of the 6 at all; in fact, with my next post, my favorite logo is a very simple and stylized version of the bottom right one (which almost looks like the old logo, except perfected – which is probably why I like it so much).  Speaking of my next post, it will feature my revamped business card template, in which I currently use today.

Cityscape Composition

My first attempt at capturing a cityscape composition

While attending BCTC for a Design degree, it was obvious that I would eventually have to stretch my artistic muscles once again, but this time through various styles and programs.  Using Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, and others would help me reclaim a glimmer of artistic talent that was dormant for many years, prior.

Like with the landscape composition I did prior to this one, I was tasked with creating another scene; however this one had to be a bit more “synthetic,” creating a cityscape using, yet again, only the most basic of tools Illustrator offers us.  I had a picture in my arsenal that I really liked (which can be viewed here), and thought that it was both very doable (at this stage of my “development” with illustrator) and would also provide enough of a challenge to get me to think and try to do things differently than I had before.

Taking into account the shear density of the city below the majestic pool that floated above, I knew that if I were going to make the deadline for the project, I would have to “cut some corners,” as it were, and minimize the scope a bit (both in the scene itself and how I would actually be creating the objects, themselves).  During a game jam I participated in a year prior, I had to create various concept art of various worlds, some having cityscapes on their surfaces (however, those were of a smaller scale than this one).  I created different techniques for duplicating and distorting a handful of objects into half-a-dozen or more, and implemented those techniques into this piece; as you can probably tell, there is only around 5 unique buildings scattered about, while the rest of them are changed-up duplicates.  I tried to spread out the objects to make sure there was no monotony or too much repetition anywhere to be found, and felt I came away with a better knowledge on a few things, mostly including how to use space and negative-space accordingly!

 

Landscape Composition

My very first attempt at a true landscape composition

While attending BCTC for a Design degree, it was obvious that I would eventually have to stretch my artistic muscles once again, but this time through various styles and programs.  Using Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, and others would help me reclaim a glimmer of artistic talent that was dormant for many years, prior.

Being my very first, “fully realized” art piece, attempting to create a still life landscape using only the most basic tools of Illustrator, I feel it came out better than expected and actually keeps the expression of the photo that this inspired.  Using only the pen tool and some basic shapes (utilizing the wonderful pathfinder tools), I found myself working on this for two days: playing around with what could work, how I could create a stylized shading for the entirety of the piece, and trying to bring it all together with cohesion and a nice balance of color and density.

Even though I can only take so much credit for this piece (considering, like I said, it was a reworking of someone else’s photo, which can be viewed here), I came away with a newfound confidence that I could, indeed, create a complex work of “art” using something more than just rudimentary shapes with gradients and subtle strokes (even though that is definitely a sound way of doing things, haha).

 

Yenen’s Tale Assets, Part 7

The two parts to the Par’Nian cave

During my second foray into the college life, I decided to go for an Associate’s in Video Game Design (specifically for the artsy side of the process, rather than the technical parts, for now).  During these two years at BCTCS, I have learned how to create GDDs appropriately, construct 3D models using Maya, create textures for those models (using Photoshop and Maya), import assets and create small games with said assets within Unity, and learned overall about the new and old techniques it takes to make an efficient and unique video game.

As with the other landscape pieces I did, I wanted to keep to the same color pallet and themes, and use for those the cave that would be cradle for the centerpiece of this particular scene; this cave can be ventured into in-game, but it is not as deep as it may appear.  As for the dirt flooring panel I created, I used it as both the flooring of the cave itself, and as “visible floors” for the player, so they would not be able to venture out of the desired playing area, messing up any semblance of cohesion, haha.

Even though all of the the objects I created were low-poly – regardless of the player model, enemy model, the weapon, the items, whatever – I still feel they all came out better than I had hoped, and feel after putting them together in the scene I keep mentioning, they all fit together perfectly, and really helps show off what I was trying to portray.  At this current moment I am working on an Alpha version of this game/scene and plan on rolling out a working Beta at the end of this month (of April), so look forward to some actual game play (whether through a linked video, posted .gif file, or what-have-you)!

Yenen’s Tale Assets, Part 6


During my second foray into the college life, I decided to go for an Associate’s in Video Game Design (specifically for the artsy side of the process, rather than the technical parts, for now).  During these two years at BCTCS, I have learned how to create GDDs appropriately, construct 3D models using Maya, create textures for those models (using Photoshop and Maya), import assets and create small games with said assets within Unity, and learned overall about the new and old techniques it takes to make an efficient and unique video game.

After creating the game objects that would, more or less, act as the intractable items in the scene (the Kay Crystal, the Kumojahitii Blade, Yenen, himself, etc.), it was then time to create the actual landscape pieces that would act as both artistic scenery bolsters and technical area boundaries.  After creating some brief concept art of the planet Par’N (in which this game takes places) some time ago, I have been expounding on the ideas I had previously come up with, and attempted to stay true to the look and lore of this already established planet.

With that being said, I wanted this area of the game, in particular, to somewhat tone down the official lore (where a lot of the planet began implementing Signa technology, rendering a lot of their foliage and landscapes as “geo-mechanical”) and showcase an area of the planet that hadn’t really been touched by the most recent wave of technology; I wanted hints of the planet’s technology (like the particle generating light post) spread throughout, but not being the foundation in which the level was built upon.

So, considering this scene would mostly be showing the untouched version of what most of Par’N might have looked like, I had to create the landscape objects with a more organic look, compared to most of the other game objects.  Also, with Par’N being a tropical and almost entirely flooded planet (at this point in the story), I had to take this into consideration when creating the base meshes and eventual textures (with a lot of foliage on the rocks/mountains and their shapes showing signs of weathered use by the elements.

Yenen’s Tale Assets, Part 5

A low-poly version of the “LoS” character, Yenen, for a current project

During my second foray into the college life, I decided to go for an Associate’s in Video Game Design (specifically for the artsy side of the process, rather than the technical parts, for now).  During these two years at BCTCS, I have learned how to create GDDs appropriately, construct 3D models using Maya, create textures for those models (using Photoshop and Maya), import assets and create small games with said assets within Unity, and learned overall about the new and old techniques it takes to make an efficient and unique video game.

After creating my first version of Yenen during my 3rd semester – a higher-poly version that, personally, didn’t fit any standard of excellence – I felt I needed to do him better justice, so when my last semester came around and I was tasked with creating a low-poly RPG, I knew I could definitely make something better than I had before; as they say, less is sometimes better.

With that being said, my inspiration were the oddly formed character sprites of the PS1 days (with games like FF7, FF9, Legend of LeGaia, etc.), and wanted to pay tribute to the games I grew up with and helped mold me into who I am today.  Even though this may seem like is a crude model to some (barely reaching 1,000 polys and keeping to a simplistic texture style), I am way prouder of this compared to the first one I staggered through, and can’t wait to start animating it (in which I will post about in a couple of months)!

Yenen’s Tale Assets, Part 4


During my second foray into the college life, I decided to go for an Associate’s in Video Game Design (specifically for the artsy side of the process, rather than the technical parts, for now).  During these two years at BCTCS, I have learned how to create GDDs appropriately, construct 3D models using Maya, create textures for those models (using Photoshop and Maya), import assets and create small games with said assets within Unity, and learned overall about the new and old techniques it takes to make an efficient and unique video game.

Sticking with a low-poly, stylized design for my Final project in Video Game Development, I reached into my well of a mind and brought out an enemy type similar to one that can be found in an old PS1 game entitled “Legend of LeGaia.”  Being one of my top 100 games, I thought I’d do some throwback to the title, and then add my own flair.  With that being said, even though the shape itself is similar, the color palette and lore behind this creature is completely different.  I wanted to create a metallic bug-like creature that would have slashes across its carapace, as if others had been trying to defeat this beast for a while prior to the player finding it.  It’s greatest weak point is its “stomach cage,” which can be seen accompanied with light sources to give the player’s sight some direction, showcasing its gooey, purple center; which the color purple will be indicative of an enemy type, representing the color of the “lost” 6th Buntaien, Normg.

I feel like I could have done better with the textures and model overall, but this was an optional thing we had to create, and I just wanted to create some bulky, intimidating, and personally familiar.