Project Maze v0.0.3 Playthrough


For a while now, my fiance and myself have been brainstorming ideas for a story, one that happens after the events of the 1980’s Jim Henson and David Bowie movie called “Labyrinth.”  Even before I met her, she apparently had been wanting to write a fan-made sequel novel to the movie, to explore the story of who the Goblin King really was, and his eventual relationship with an older Sarah.  One day, she decided to tell me about this idea of hers, knowing I also loved the original movie, and in my spare time – over a couple of years – I thought of how I could transcribe this new story as being more interactive (as in video game form).

From there, once I started to learn Unity and Maya in college – also in more spare time (of which there wasn’t much) – I was able to create a white box model of some of the movie, to test to see if it was an interesting place to revisit in a game.  Indeed, after much level planning (watching the movie over and over and taking still shots of certain angles of certain scenes), I was able to basically make a 1:1 version of the movie in Unity.  Over several months of adding in models, grass textures, music, and a few scripts to help showcase the very basic features of our overall idea, we had something that was both playable, and definitely nostalgic.

The above video is the entirety of what I got  in the Unity scene, so far; with the Goblin King’s castle in the distance, spurning the player to want more.  However, as I somewhat said above, the idea we have in mind is not a digital remake of the movie, but rather the events that happen afterwards; so, the Alpha version (and others) of the actual game wouldn’t showcase these areas as they are seen in the video.

Enjoy the trailer!

SPAce v1.5

The logo for SPAce

Considering the version of “SPAce” in “Dreams” on Google Play isn’t the newest iteration my fiance and I ended up creating, we wanted other people – not just those that went to Lexplay ’17 – to be able to experience it in a more perfected form, as well.  Version 1.5 has some changes here and there, with a few tidbits we were able to update in the small time we had between Rules and Play art gallery and Lexplay.  The link below goes to my personal Itch.io page for “SPAce,” where you can download, donate (only if you choose to), rate, and comment.  Please let me and my fiance know what you think!

Play SPAce!

Sol Mates v1.5

The logo for Sol Mates (Dreams Version)

Considering the version of “Sol Mates” in “Dreams” on Google Play isn’t the newest iteration I ended up creating, I wanted other people – not just those that went to Lexplay ’17 – to be able to experience it in a more perfected form, as well.  Version 1.5 has a variety of changes: from different sound effects, different textures here and there, and a few other tidbits I was able to update in the small time I had between Rules and Play art gallery and Lexplay.  The link below goes to my personal Itch.io page for “Sol Mates: Earthen Star,” where you can download, donate (only if you choose to), rate, and comment.  Please let me know what you think!

Play Sol Mates!

Dreams: A VR Art Gallery v1.1

The original (but not official) logo for Dreams

The final Gold version of “Dreams” we created was published right before Lexplay Gaming Convention ’17, so we could allow convention goers a chance to download the app on their phones, and use the Google Cardboard headsets we had to play the game in its original form.  It is still hanging around the Google Play store, and is in waiting for your eyes and ears.  The game is free for all to play (as long as you have a smartphone – we might plan on releasing an iOS version eventually), and please feel free to leave an honest review or rating on there for us!  The link to download “Dreams: A VR Art Gallery” is right below.

Play Dreams: A VR Art Gallery!

SPAce Trailer (Lexplay Version)


During Lexplay Gaming Convention ’17, we at HVRE were given our own booth for the entire weekends, and we got to show off both the VR version on Google Cardboards – that we’d pass out to onlookers – and stand-alone versions on laptops for those that didn’t want to download the app to their phones or get “strapped” into a headset.  Half of the games on the VR version were built out to play on regular Windows’ computers, and with that, I went back to “SPAce” and “Sol Mates” right before the convention and made a few small changes that would reflect the new platform they were on (compared to the VR versions, that had different control schemes and other small variations).

Enjoy the trailer!

Sol Mates Trailer (Lexplay Version)


During Lexplay Gaming Convention ’17, we at HVRE were given our own booth for the entire weekends, and we got to show off both the VR version on Google Cardboards – that we’d pass out to onlookers – and stand-alone versions on laptops for those that didn’t want to download the app to their phones or get “strapped” into a headset.  Half of the games on the VR version were built out to play on regular Windows’ computers, and with that, I went back to “Sol Mates” and “SPAce” right before the convention and made a few small changes that would reflect the new platform they were on (compared to the VR versions, that had different control schemes and other small variations).

Enjoy the trailer!

Dreams Presentation at Morlan Gallery


After months of working on our games for HVRE 2017 (a collection of games known simply as “Dreams”), we were invited to several events to host and show off what we had done.  The first of the events was the Rules & Play Interactive Art Exhibit that happens twice a year in Lexington, Kentucky.  The third would eventually be what we had building up to this whole time; Lexington’s only gaming convention, Lexplay ’17.  However, in between those two events, we got to present our work at three different showings at Transylvania University’s own Moral Art Gallery, as part of a theme of futuristic, interactive art.

The first two showings at Morlan were fairly tame, garnering a couple dozen people (or more) at each one.  We got to relax and let others play our games using the Vive VR headset, as we conversed with our onlookers about the development process that had transpired.  For the last showing at Morlan, it was to be more of a presentation, rather than just simply allowing random art goers to come in and out to look at the gallery.

Myself and the technical lead of “Dreams” got the chance to stand in front of a decent crowd (with definitely more people than had attended before), and for an hour we got to both talk about and show off all of the hard work we had put into it.  The curator of the gallery seemed quite pleased with our presentation and the games we had created, as well as the students, art seekers, and walk-ins that were there that day.  It was great to be able to converse with an audience about something I am passionate about, and gave me a boost of confidence seeing so many people interested.  We were even interviewed by a writer for a local magazine and was placed in a printed article the very next month.

Enjoy the video!